Each month I host an open meeting at Browsers Bookshop, Woodbridge in Suffolk. We usually focus on modern fiction and the discussion regularly attracts around 20 people, men and women, of all ages.

24th September 2018
Swimming Home
by Deborah Levy
Join in the friendly discussion over coffee and flapjack, or a glass of wine.
30th July 2018
The Unseen
by Roy Jacobsen
A lively discussion as some thought this a stunning account of a rare way of life beautifully and imaginatively written. Others found the use of dialect, odd sentence structure and 'lack of story' jarring.
25th June 2018
Tiny Sunbirds Far Away
by Christie Watson
Almost universal praise for this book despite often difficult subject matter. The female characters were particularly strong and the book gave an insight to Nigerian culture and politics which delighted, fascinated and horrified.
4th June 2018
A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles
Barack Obama named this as one of his favourite books in 2017. What will we make of it? Join in the friendly discussion over coffee and flapjack, or a glass of wine.
30th April 2018
Peculiar Ground
by Lucy Hughes-Hallet
All agreed the writing was beautiful but while a couple of people have recommended widely and are reading again, most felt there were too many characters and the story fragmented.
3rd April 2018
Midwinter Break
by Bernard MacLaverty
Beautifully written with so many layers to unpack, it was standing room only for this discussion. A few people found they couldn't relate to the characters, but most found the presentation of a long relationship and the things left unsaid to be fascinating and moving.
5th March 2018
Based on a True Story
by Delphine de Vigan
A book about friendship, writing and the boundary between reality and fantasy. Is this a novel? A thriller? A memoir? What will you decide? Come along to share your view. We're meeting a week later than usual, skipping a February date.
29th January 2018
My Name is Leon
by Kit de Waal
Warm, charming characters in a slice of life from the 1980s. Humour and tragedy, told from the perspective of a nine-year-old boy. Most loved this book though some thought it too slow and couldn't engage with the narrator.